It’s showtime!

Today’s the day! You’re waving over at your new employee, welcoming them into their new workspace. Let’s get them as excited as you are for their new role. Follow these 6 steps to create an enjoyable and memorable onboarding experience for their first few days at work!

1. Tour the office space

Have you created a thoughtful office layout and design to inspire your team? Show it off. Do you have a closet overflowing with office supplies or a kitchen with coffee refills? Let them know where it is. Begin with showing them around their new office space. Let them get acquainted and gain the confidence to learn where everything is.

2. Get to know your new employee

Remember, your employees are your greatest strength and contribute to your organization’s success. Express genuine interest in understanding their preferences by inviting them to a meeting on their first day. Here, you'll learn their preferred work style, communications, strengths/weaknesses, and career objectives. Getting to know someone isn’t easy. So try to make your meeting as informal as possible. Maybe meet up to grab a cup of coffee or to chat in your organization’s lounge. Remember the idea here is to make allow them to feel comfortable enough to express their interests and concerns.

3. Review the benefits plan

Let’s start with why you need to do this.

Your business is spending a tremendous amount of money on your benefits program. A program that’s connected to your employee value proposition and similar business results. If you don't review your benefits plan with your new employee, they won't understand it's value or worse, won't use it.

Then, there's the fact that benefits are just flat out important. You’re talking about the well being and financial security of an employee. This is an employee's life back-up plan if they were to run into an illness, injury, or death (the same applies to their family members).

NOTE: HR and employers play a critical role in educating a new employee on these incredibly important topics.

What information about the organization’s benefits should you communicate?

Benefits are primarily split up into three areas:

Pooled Benefits

  • Employee Life Insurance
  • Accidental Death & Dismemberment
  • Dependent's Life Insurance
  • Long Term Disability

Experience Benefits

  • Health Insurance (individual and family)
  • Dental Insurance (individual and family)

Paramedical

  • Chiropractor
  • Massage therapist
  • Naturopath
  • and more

Focus on communicating how to use the benefits to get something valuable. It should be about how they can use the benefits that are the most relevant to them. Use this time to stress why your benefits package is structured the way it is. Are most of your employee's young adults? Do you promote an active culture? Maybe that’s why you have a benefits plan geared towards paramedical needs or a fitness plan. Do have a large manual labour component? Explain how your primary goal is to mitigate risk with your organization’s plan.

Focus on communicating how to use their benefits to get something valuable. It should be about how they can use the benefits that are the most relevant to them. Use this time to stress why your benefits package is structured the way it is. Are most of your employee's young adults? Do you promote an active culture? Maybe that’s why you have a benefits plan geared towards paramedical needs or a fitness plan. Do have a large manual labour component? Explain how your primary goal is to mitigate risk with your organization’s plan.

Even though most businesses have a 3 month waiting period, it’s important to educate a new employee on how group insurance works. Group insurance is an investment. So, there’s no better day than during their first day or week to walk them through this investment offered by your organization. Continue building that excitement and connection to your business. Explain how group insurance is like car insurance: if you keep making claims, costs go up. But stress that it’s fine to make claims and encouraged, as long as they are using benefits that are relevant to them.

4. Take your new employee out for lunch or create a social hour in their honour

If you’ve ever been the new kid at school, you’d understand the feeling of sitting alone in the cafeteria. Try to prevent that feeling from occurring to your new employee by inviting them out for lunch. You can consider offering it to the entire team or just keep it simple with the new employee and their boss.

Lunch is also a great leeway for the new employee to create conversations concerning the team structure and expectations. They can learn what their colleagues do specifically, how they may be able to assist them and how willing they may be to answering questions during their first few days in the new role.

Another initiative you can take, instead of lunch, would be to have a small social event in their honour. One idea could be providing coffee and snacks in the breakroom for an hour to allow everyone in the office to introduce themselves.

5. Review what your organization's culture really means

Of course, endorsing a great organizational culture is fun and it should be, but it’s also the underpinnings of performance and revenues at your business. This is where you align overall performance expectations with your organizational culture. The goal here is to create an emotional tie and commitment with your new employee. By doing so, they'll develop the sense that they're apart of a greater whole.

Let's examine a philosophy at Netflix from Patty McCord, Head of Talent Aquisition. Combine Patty’s insight with an awesome onboarding experience and you’ve got the ingredients for an incredible HR recipe.

“If you’re careful to hire people who will put the company’s interests first, who understand and support the desire for a high-performance workplace, 97% of your employees will do the right thing. Most companies spend endless time and money writing and enforcing HR policies to deal with problems the other 3% might cause. Instead, we tried really hard to not hire those people, and we let them go if it turned out we’d made a hiring mistake.”

6. Prepare the next 30-60-90 day plan

Onboarding doesn't stop after their first day in their new role. You’ll need to continue implementing programs that provide you with a deeper understanding of your employee. Start by empowering your employee with a 30-60-90 day plan. Make sure to prepare this plan with them during their first week in their new role.

A 30-60-90 day plan is an action plan for what your new employee will achieve in the next 30, 60 and 90 days. A well thought out plan allows you to visualize your new employee capabilities within the next few months. More importantly, this plan organizes their time, prioritize tasks and strategize their approaches. It acts as a guide to clarify expectations. It’s important to include your new employee when creating this plan so they can add their own goals.

With creating clear goals and expectations, your new employee will feel more confident in their new role.

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